Thyme

Thyme is a tiny-leaved herb that is most often used in French cooking.  Make sure to strip the leaves from the woody stems before adding them to recipes (unless it’s used to flavor a roast or soup and then removed before serving!).  Run your finger and thumb along the stems (the opposite direction of growth) … Continue reading Thyme

Chamomile Flowers

Scientific Name: Matricaria recutita Common Names: German chamomile, Roman chamomile, wild chamomile Family: Asteraceae-Daisy Family Part Used: flower heads Properties:  analgesic , anti-inflammatory, anti-depressant, anti-fungal, anti-septic, anti-bacterial, anti-rheumatic, anti-spasmodic, anti-viral, diuretic, sedative Uses:  indigestion, gas, bloating, heartburn, peptic ulcers, to calm nervousness, insomnia, spasms in stomach and muscles, diluted for children (colic, insomnia, upset stomach), hair rinse … Continue reading Chamomile Flowers

Bay Leaves

Common Names:  Bay Laurel, Sweet Bay, True Laurel Botanical Name:  Laurus nobilis Family:  Lauraceae Bay Leaves, there are two popular types — Mediterranean and Californian. The Mediterranean is milder in flavor. Bay leaves are usually used dry  to reduce some of their bitterness, but can be used fresh too. Commonly used in classic chicken soup, … Continue reading Bay Leaves

How to Make A Herbal Decoction

Decoctions are preferred for harder herbs like roots, barks, and seeds, it takes longer to release the healing properties.  It’s best, but not necessary, to mash or grind the thick herb before use.  To make a decoction, you just need the following steps: •Use 1 tablespoon dried herb per 1 1/2 cup of cold, filtered … Continue reading How to Make A Herbal Decoction